May Day

May 1st is a holiday in many countries. One such holiday is International Workers’ Day (a name used interchangeably with May Day) a celebration of the achievements of the international labor movement. In the United States many view it as a socialist or communist celebration, although the day is the commemoration of the Haymarket Riot in Chicago in 1886.

he Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (FOTLU) of the United States and Canada had set the date of May 1, 1886, as the date by which the eight-hour work day would become the standard work day. In the Chicago area of Haymarket Square on May 4, a riot broke out between strikers against employers who did not grant the 8 hour work day. The strikers lost.

May Day is also a holiday that was celebrated in pagan Europe. It was a festival day to celebrate the spring planting. For the Druids it was the second most important day in the year when they celebrated the festival of Beltane.

From this May Day celebration comes the May Pole and the May Pole Dance. In the Middle Ages the villages would bring a pole to the center of the village from the adjoining forest. At times neighboring villages would even have contest to see who had the tallest pole.

In the bigger towns, such as London, the poles would become a permanent structure. This custom came to America with the English colonist. One such structure in the center of New York was renamed the Liberty Pole just prior to the beginning of the Revolutionary War.

At Washington College, a small Liberal Arts College located on Maryland”s Eastern Shore, the first of May has become a day when the students celebrate the coming of the end of the semester and the beginning of summer with an unique liberating May Day tradition.

Cover of the Rolling Stone

“The Cover of ‘Rolling Stone'” was written by Shel Silverstein with Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show recording it. It was the band’s third single and peaked at number six on the U.S. pop chart for two weeks on March 17–24, 1973.

Dr Hook And The Medicine Show did get their picture on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine on March 29, 1973 issue. It was only a caricature of the band not a photograph and the band name was not mentioned. The caption was, “What’s-Their-Names Make the Cover.”

It’s been reported that they really did buy five copies for their mothers.

Welcome to our – View from the Shore

Welcome!

Sometimes it takes three to make a successful venture and this site will feature:

H. August Knight with his ‘From a Fan’s View’ of the Arts

Toni Lynne is a child of the ’70s and present videos and information of the music of the 70’s with 70’s Music Revisited

Steve Atkinson started 6 Things to Consider in 2006, when he wrote 6 paragraphs on a random subject. That site has been lost due to technical issue and will be revived here.